About your Search

20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
government's role in infrastructure, in science and technology, would take us so far away from what we need, i wish president obama had the revenues to do more, but it is the republican side that is blocking that because that party has one idea only. and that is to cut taxes for the rich. we have this multi-brazilian there running for office. his money is in the cayman island. he pays 13% in taxes. he says the most important thing is to cut the tax rates at the top for the. it is mind-boggling that we have this kind of blatant candidacy. people are hurting, people are upset. that is why this weirdness even has a choice. but it would take as exactly in the wrong direction. president obama could have done more and would have done more if the republican opposition had not blocked the end of the bush era tax cuts for the rich, for example. so romney is in quite a position to be blaming president obama for that when it is exactly this side that has made the kind of recovery we need so fleeting and evanescent. we need a strong recovery, but the policies he is recommending would be the opposite of
of english, at least three years of mathematics, at least three years of science and at least three years of social science, comparedded to those who students who did not complete a core curriculum, those students completing a core curriculum scored 144 points higher on the s.a.t. >> suarez: what do we know about the predictive value of the test itself? you have a threshold for college readiness. if you go into an institution of higher learning without reaching that threshold, are you automatically going to fail, not complete? what do we know? >> absolutely not. that threshold is a guide. it allows us to look at groups of students. what we know is that the group of students who meet the threshold have a 65% likelihood of achieving a b-minus g.p.a. or higher during their freshman year. obviously there are other factors that admission officers take into consideration. but it does help guide us in thinking about where we are and the need to have more students better prepared for college. currently of 100 ninth graders, 44 will go on to college. yet only 21 will graduate within a six-year per
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
the best possible science, and they have shown that it's possible to improve care and by improving care, reduce the overall cost of care. james: we deliver about 34,000 children a year. it turns out we have the ability to start labor artificially. it's called elective induction. now, sometimes you have to get that baby delivered because the mom's health or the baby health will be affected. an elective induction is purely for convenience. the direct consequence of inappropriate elective induction is cesarean section deliveries. we've seen huge differences in rates of cesarean section across the country, and the evidence is increasingly clear that the higher rates are not necessarily good for patients. the national c-section rate today is running about 34%. intermountain as a system is running at about 20%. some hospitals in this country have c-section rates as high as 45%. feinberg: our rates of c-section in santa monica are high. we really want to do not one more c-section than necessary, but in all of these improvements, it's changing behaviors of patients, it's changing behaviors of p
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel's prime minister warned again today that iran is well on its way to creating a nuclear weapon and said the world needs to act. benjamin netanyahu spoke at the united nations. as he has often before, netanyahu condemned iran and its nuclear program, and called on other leaders to do the same. >> at stake is not merely the future of my country. at stake is the future of the world. and nothing could imperil our common future more than the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. >> woodruff: the israeli prime minister said the hour is, quote, "getting late" to stop iran as it continues its nuclear work. >> i speak about it now because the iranian nuclear calendar doesn't take time out for anyone or for anything. i speak aut it now because when it com
of being a science fair project and give it to the opportunity to take on the goliath problem of the 21st century, bad water, we call the project slingshot because slingshot was the little piece of technology that was given to david and as the kid i remember the story of david and goliath and the moral to me was you use technology properly, slingshot and you will take out goliath. >> rose: so what do we have here? i want to show it in just a moment. >> so in this little accurate scale model of a shipping container which could be put into a village, is -- >> rose: shipping container. there is an actual model of a standard shipping container, this is eight feet by ten feet by 20 feet, here is the actual scale model next to a person of the slingshot. >> rose: right. >> it makes 1,000-liters of water a day and even if you closeup at night and hopefully the women that will run this downtown, it will sit inside here all night filling up thousand liter reservoirs that are accessible outside so all day and all night people can get clean water, be but basically the this is the downtown, if you al
results in just two days. the research was published in the journal, "science translational medicine." the paper reported the tests of just six newborns in neonatal units, but the implications could be widespread. roughly 20% of infant deaths in the u.s. are caused by inherited genetic conditions, according to the study. doctor stephen kingsmore led the research team at children's mercy hospitals in kansas city. he's the director for the center for pediatric genomic medicine there. dr. kingsmore, welcome, and thank you for being with us. first of all,-- >> thank you very much. >> warner: how big a breakthrough is this? >> this is a big breakthrough. we've been working toward this goal for a coup of years now. there has been a big gap between the knowledge that we have of genetic diseases, about 35% of them, and the ability for doctors to identify which of these was a problem in any given child with an illness. >> warner: and up until now, how much have you been able to diagnose the d.n.a. abnormalities? how quickly? i mean, i said it can take weeks and weeks, but what's the process t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)